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Google Updates ‘Link Scheme’ Definitions

Posted by Michael Bloch in web marketing (Saturday August 3, 2013 )

While these have been talked about for a while, they are now ‘official’. Updated a couple of weeks ago, the new additions are:

– Large-scale article marketing or guest posting campaigns with keyword-rich anchor text links

– Advertorials or native advertising where payment is received for articles that include links that pass PageRank

– Links with optimized anchor text in articles or press releases distributed on other sites.

The first point is really a building on of Google’s previous frowning on article marketing – but it used to be just about the quality of content and duplicate content. This new point means that even high quality and unique content may be in G’s crosshairs.

Read all Google’s “link scheme” warnings – there’s a number of other strategies that the company lumps into this basket.

This is all a part of a move to forcing more “natural” SEO – i.e. building content that folks want to naturally link to purely given the quality of the content.

As for dropping naked links in these sorts of articles, the safest bet now is just your site’s URL; not keyword rich anchor text.

SEO is rapidly changing. With a site I built recently, I did very little in the way of external SEO, choosing to focus 99% of my effort on on-page factors and content – and that has paid off; it just requires a little more patience to see it bear fruit. To me, the effort is exactly the same in terms of prep time.

If you’re a publisher who allows guest article posting and advertorials, Google advises adding nofollow to outbound links.

There are also other reasons to be wary of guest post submissions – learn more here.

I’ve seen some industry publications stating Google’s new guidelines mean linking to a press release elsewhere can get you into hot water as well. I don’t believe this to be the case; generally speaking. Educational institutions, government departments and other high profile destinations often publish press releases and these sources are hardly low quality. Google actually wants sites to link to high quality content as this plays a factor in how sites are ranked. However, it is best to link to the source’s copy of the release, rather than a copy.

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Building links? You probably want to be aware of some changes Google has made to how it defines a ‘link scheme’.

While these have been talked about for a while, they are now ‘official’. Updated a couple of weeks ago, the new additions are:

– Large-scale article marketing or guest posting campaigns with keyword-rich anchor text links

– Advertorials or native advertising where payment is received for articles that include links that pass PageRank

– Links with optimized anchor text in articles or press releases distributed on other sites.

The first point is really a building on of Google’s previous frowning on article marketing – but it used to be just about the quality of content and duplicate content. This new point means that even high quality and unique content may be in G’s crosshairs.

Read all Google’s “link scheme” warnings – there’s a number of other strategies that the company lumps into this basket.

This is all a part of a move to forcing more “natural” SEO – i.e. building content that folks want to naturally link to purely given the quality of the content.

As for dropping naked links in these sorts of articles, the safest bet now is just your site’s URL; not keyword rich anchor text.

SEO is rapidly changing. With a site I built recently, I did very little in the way of external SEO, choosing to focus 99% of my effort on on-page factors and content – and that has paid off; it just requires a little more patience to see it bear fruit. To me, the effort is exactly the same in terms of prep time.

If you’re a publisher who allows guest article posting and advertorials, Google advises adding nofollow to outbound links.

There are also other reasons to be wary of guest post submissions – learn more here.

I’ve seen some industry publications stating Google’s new guidelines mean linking to a press release elsewhere can get you into hot water as well. I don’t believe this to be the case; generally speaking. Educational institutions, government departments and other high profile destinations often publish press releases and these sources are hardly low quality. Google actually wants sites to link to high quality content as this plays a factor in how sites are ranked. However, it is best to link to the source’s copy of the release, rather than a copy.



 

 
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