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Spam statistics – June 2006

Posted by Michael Bloch in online world (Friday June 30, 2006 )

How spammers get around domain name registration systems in this way the report doesn’t say; although it isn’t uncommon for fraudsters to register domain names with stolen details – they get the use of the name sometimes for a short period – days, weeks, even months. But IronPort seems to be referring to a different sort of rort altogether.

It’s perhaps tied in with the fact that after a domain name is registered, the registrar has five days to drop the name and get a refund. This tends to suggests that some registrars are perhaps behind the spamming? I’m not so sure; you’d think that ICANN, the governing body for domain names would pick up on this.

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Image spam, emails containing no text but just a .gif or .jpg image, has grown from less than 1% in June 2005 to over 12% this month according to a recently released study based on 25% of the world’s email traffic.

The increase represents over 5 billion image based spams being sent every day.

The report also states that over 80% of spam is now zombie generated. A zombie is a computer that has been compromised by unauthorized parties, with the owner of the system being usually being unaware that their system is being used as a spam conduit.

On top of all that good news, it’s estimated that from April 2006 to June 2006 the volume of spam has surged by around 40 percent globally, after a brief slowing of growth late in 2005. In June 2005, there were an estimated 30 billion spams sent daily; it’s now sitting around the 55 billion mark – an increase of 83%

The company that published the report, IronPort, reveals an interesting strategy in use by spammers I wasn’t aware of. Spammers are exploiting domain name registration systems by registering a name for a few days, then allowing it to expire before paying for the registration. Supposedly there were 35 million domain names registered in April and nearly 90% of those were unpaid for and expired after 5 days.

How spammers get around domain name registration systems in this way the report doesn’t say; although it isn’t uncommon for fraudsters to register domain names with stolen details – they get the use of the name sometimes for a short period – days, weeks, even months. But IronPort seems to be referring to a different sort of rort altogether.

It’s perhaps tied in with the fact that after a domain name is registered, the registrar has five days to drop the name and get a refund. This tends to suggests that some registrars are perhaps behind the spamming? I’m not so sure; you’d think that ICANN, the governing body for domain names would pick up on this.

Learn more about how spam winds up in your inbox

Learn about anti-spam filtering services and try a free trial.



 

 
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