Internet marketing resources, ecommerce web site design tutorials and  just for fun - free cell phone ringtones!
  Taming the Beast - quality web marketing and ecommerce development services

Ecommerce and faltering trust

Posted by Michael Bloch in ecommerce (Saturday December 2, 2006 )

Here’s some things you can do to promote trust and reassure your visitors followed by links to articles I’ve published on those topics:

– Be clear on your terms of sale

– Make it easy for people to contact you; be it through email, phone or otherwise. Live chat has been shown to be beneficial in boosting consumer confidence.

– Ensure your “about” or profile page is detailed, not full of generic or “we’re the best” type content.

– Have a published privacy policy

– Showcase trade association affiliations

– Create a testimonial page using *real* people – full names, URL, email address and photos if possible to accompany their comments

– Your site should look professional and the content needs to be solid

– Implement business certification seals

– Ensure PCI compliance and promote that fact

– Use SSL (secure sockets layer) for any transactions or submission of sensitive data.

– Reputation management; keep an eye on what others are saying about you around the web, as your potential customers may also do research on your or your company.

– Be careful what you post on other sites; a slanging match you’ve engaged in elsewhere could come back to haunt you

– Consider offering a refund guarantee.

Articles related to the above points:

Minimizing shopping cart abandonment

Achieving PCI compliance

Reassuring your visitors

How to create a privacy page

Live chat services review

Defending your online reputation

-->

A recent report states that due to fear regarding the security of the Internet and online transactions, nearly $2 billion in U.S. ecommerce sales will be lost during 2006.

The good news is that there are simple things that online businesses can do to foster trust, decrease site and shopping cart abandonment – and some of the strategies cost very little to implement.

The Gartner survey of 5,000 US online adults revealed that over $900 million in e-commerce sales were lost among online shoppers and another billion dollars through people who refuse to shop online at all due to security concerns.

Gartner.com also states that 70% of online consumers who have been spooked by security incidents say that their concerns have impacted on trust of email coming from parties they are not familiar with and in most instances, they will delete the email without first viewing the contents.

It is good to see people being cautious, it’s just a shame that as always, concern turns to fear and that fear can become paranoia. Still, I do acknowledge that it’s better to be paranoid than to have your identity stolen, your card maxed out or your bank account cleaned out.

As online business merchants, we now need to work extra hard to gain the trust of our visitors and potential clients. As mentioned, it doesn’t necessarily involve spending mega-bucks to do so.

Here’s some things you can do to promote trust and reassure your visitors followed by links to articles I’ve published on those topics:

– Be clear on your terms of sale

– Make it easy for people to contact you; be it through email, phone or otherwise. Live chat has been shown to be beneficial in boosting consumer confidence.

– Ensure your “about” or profile page is detailed, not full of generic or “we’re the best” type content.

– Have a published privacy policy

– Showcase trade association affiliations

– Create a testimonial page using *real* people – full names, URL, email address and photos if possible to accompany their comments

– Your site should look professional and the content needs to be solid

– Implement business certification seals

– Ensure PCI compliance and promote that fact

– Use SSL (secure sockets layer) for any transactions or submission of sensitive data.

– Reputation management; keep an eye on what others are saying about you around the web, as your potential customers may also do research on your or your company.

– Be careful what you post on other sites; a slanging match you’ve engaged in elsewhere could come back to haunt you

– Consider offering a refund guarantee.

Articles related to the above points:

Minimizing shopping cart abandonment

Achieving PCI compliance

Reassuring your visitors

How to create a privacy page

Live chat services review

Defending your online reputation



 

 
Comments for Ecommerce and faltering trust

No comments yet.

Sorry, the comment form is closed at this time.